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OSHA Bundle (Online)

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The OSHA Bundle offers you all of the OSHA Safety & Health Fundamentals titles, OSHA Hazardous Waste Training titles, and OSHA "SpotLight On" Topic titles for one great low price!
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Additional information about OSHA Bundle (Online)

The OSHA Bundle offers you all of the OSHA Safety & Health Fundamentals titles, OSHA Hazardous Waste Training titles, and OSHA "SpotLight On" Topic titles for one great low price!

This bundle contains the following tasks:

  • Asbestos (Construction)
  • Asbestos (General Industry)
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Concrete and Masonry Construction
  • Construction Safety: Struck-by and Caught-In or Between Hazards
  • Crane Safety (Construction) 2010
  • Electrical Safety (Construction)
  • Electrical Safety (General Industry)
  • Ergonomics (Construction)
  • Ergonomics in the Office
  • Excavations (Construction)
  • Fall Protection
  • Fire Safety (Construction)
  • Fire Safety and Emergency Preparedness (General Industry)
  • First Aid
  • Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • Forklift Safety
  • GHS Hazard Communication
  • Hand and Power Tools (Construction)
  • HAZWOPER 8-Hour Refresher
  • Health Hazards in Construction: Lead and Silica
  • Hearing Conservation
  • Heavy Equipment (Construction)
  • Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)
  • Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
  • Introduction to OSHA (Construction)
  • Introduction to OSHA (General Industry)
  • Ladder Safety
  • Lockout/Tagout
  • Managing Safety and Health
  • Materials Handling (Construction)
  • Materials Handling (General Industry)
  • Permit-Required Confined Spaces
  • Personal Protective Equipment (Construction)
  • Personal Protective Equipment (General Industry)
  • Respiratory Protection
  • Safe Driving Practices
  • Scaffolds (Construction)
  • Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure
  • SpotLight on Bloodborne Pathogens: Engineering and Work Practice Controls
  • SpotLight on Bloodborne Pathogens: Infectious Diseases in the Workplace
  • Spotlight on Fire Safety: Emergency Action Plans
  • SpotLight on Fire Safety: Fire Extinguisher Requirements, Classes, and Ratings
  • SpotLight on GHS Hazard Communication: Labels
  • SpotLight on GHS Hazard Communication: Safety Data Sheets
  • Steel Erection (Construction)
  • Walking-Working Surfaces (General Industry)
  • Welding and Cutting
  • Workplace Fires and Emergencies (General Industry)

 

 

Asbestos (Construction)

Overview

Construction workers engaged in construction work where asbestos-containing materials are present or are presumed to be present (ACM and PACM) face additional hazards on the job. To protect these workers, OSHA has extensive rules for this type of work, including rules for air monitoring, medical surveillance, respiratory protection, safe work practices, and more. These are designed to keep workers safe and free from asbestos-induced illnesses.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • List some of the hazards associated with asbestos in construction workplaces and recognize some of the ways employers try to minimize those risks, using things like monitoring, communication, training, medical surveillance, and more
  • Identify the actions you can take and actions you should avoid to stay safe as you work in and around asbestos, including using personal protective equipment (PPE) and engineering controls.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926.1101

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Asbestos (General Industry)

Overview

An estimated 1.3 million employees face significant asbestos exposure on the job. Heaviest exposures occur in the construction industry, particularly during the removal of asbestos during renovation or demolition. Employees are also likely to be exposed during the manufacture of asbestos products (such as textiles, friction products, insulation, and other building materials), during automotive brake and clutch repair work, or while working in older buildings. 

This course teaches employees the basics of how to protect themselves from an asbestos hazard. Topics include the OSHA standard, PPE requirements, safe work practices, and methods of compliance.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe asbestos, its uses, and areas where you could encounter asbestos fibers
  • Identify the dangers and diseases related to asbestos exposure
  • List five components of the OSHA asbestos regulation you will need to know in your job
  • Identify the general requirements for Personal Protective Equipment, including respirator use in areas where asbestos is present
  • Identify work practices that reduce the potential for employee exposure to asbestos
  • Explain the Methods of Compliance requirements under the Asbestos Standard.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1001

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees potentially exposed to asbestos-containing material.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Bloodborne Pathogens

Overview

OSHA estimates that over five million workers may be exposed to bloodborne pathogens, including HIV and Hepatitis B. These pathogens represent a serious health risk for exposed workers. 

This course provides information and knowledge about bloodborne pathogens. It includes identification of bloodborne pathogens, how to protect oneself against exposure, and how the Exposure Control Plan protects employees. In addition, it includes information regarding the recently passed Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, and how the Bloodborne Pathogen Standard requirements have changed. 

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify bloodborne pathogens, common symptoms of exposure, and how they are transmitted
  • List engineering and work practice control measures that protect employees against exposure to bloodborne pathogens
  • Describe the importance of the elements of the Exposure Control Plan
  • Identify what requirements changed in the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard as a result of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1030

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees potentially exposed to blood or other infectious materials while on the job, including:
  • Physicians
  • Dentists
  • Phlebotomists
  • Nurses
  • Morticians
  • Paramedics
  • Housekeeping personnel
  • Home care workers
  • Others.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Concrete and Masonry Construction

Overview

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) designs and enforces standards to assure a safe work environment for America's workers. Because workers involved in concrete and masonry construction face specific hazards, OSHA has developed standards to address and help minimize those hazards.

This course covers the OSHA regulations for employees involved in concrete and masonry construction. Topics include the scope and application of the regulations, general requirements, requirements for equipment and tools used in concrete and masonry construction, requirements for working with cast-in-place concrete and pre-cast concrete, requirements for lift-slab operations, and requirements for masonry construction.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the OSHA requirements for concrete and masonry construction.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926, Subpart Q – Concrete and Masonry Construction

Approximate Length

30 minutes

Audience

This course is for all workers involved in concrete and masonry construction.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Construction Safety: Struck-by and Caught-In or Between Hazards

Overview

OSHA has found that a large number of fatalities in the Construction industry can be tied to struck-by and caught-in or caught-between incidents. Because of the injury and fatality rate associated with these types of incidents, it is extremely important for workers to be aware of potential workplace hazards. This course provides information on struck-by hazards, including vehicles and cranes, falling or flying objects, and masonry walls. It also includes information on these caught-in and caught-between hazards: trenching, unguarded machinery, and equipment.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the struck-by hazards associated with vehicles and cranes, falling or flying objects, and masonry walls, and recognize how to avoid those hazards
  • Identify the caught-in or -between hazards associated with trenching, unguarded machinery, and equipment, and recognize how to avoid those hazards.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

Employees working in construction.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Crane Safety (Construction) 2010

Overview

Cranes are very commonly used in the construction industry. Unfortunately, in addition to their usefulness, they can pose a significant hazard for workers if they are not used properly and inspection requirements are not followed.

In this course, you will learn crane safety requirements, including inspections, the use of suspended personnel platforms, the requirements for crane operators, and recognizing and avoiding common hazards.

Note: This course includes the regulatory changes that are effective November 8, 2010.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the crane safety requirements for the construction industry, including the rules for inspections, operator licensing, qualification, and certification, and suspended personnel platforms
  • Explain how to avoid accidents and identify hazards when working on or around cranes.

Features

This course has these features and more.

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR Subpart CC - Cranes and Derricks in Construction

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction employees working with or around cranes.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Electrical Safety (Construction)

Overview

Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard, exposing employees to such dangers as electric shock, electrocution, burns, fires, and explosions. To handle electricity safely, it is necessary to understand how it acts, how it can be directed, what hazards it presents, and how these hazards can be controlled. 

This course provides an overview of basic electrical safety for construction workers with little or limited training or familiarity with electrical hazards.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify how electricity works and the primary electrical hazards
  • Identify the general training requirements of the OSHA Electrical Standard for Construction
  • Identify safe work practices, including how to ground equipment, guard live parts, and use GFCIs to protect yourself from shock.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart K

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction workers who use extension cords, electric tools, etc.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Electrical Safety (General Industry)

Overview

Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard, exposing employees to such dangers as electric shock, electrocution, burns, fires, and explosions. To handle electricity safely, it is necessary to understand how it acts, how it can be directed, what hazards it presents, and how these hazards can be controlled. 

This course provides an overview of basic electrical safety for individuals with little or limited training or familiarity with electrical hazards.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify how electricity works and the primary electrical hazards
  • Identify the general training requirements of the OSHA Standard for qualified and unqualified employees
  • Identify safe work practices, including how to properly lock and tag equipment, guard live parts, and ground equipment using circuit protection devices
  • Select the proper primary and secondary personal protective equipment and identify basic safety practices for tools
  • Identify how to prevent workplace hazards by using warning signs, properly using portable cords and cables, and practicing good housekeeping.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who use extension cords, electric tools, etc.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Ergonomics (Construction)

Overview

Construction work is physically demanding. Workers often need to lift, stoop, bend, kneel, twist, stretch, and repeatedly perform other physically awkward tasks. Constantly pushing the body past its natural limits can lead to work-related musculoskeletal disorders. This is why ergonomics plays such an important role in preventing injuries on-the-job.

This course explains the role ergonomics should play in maintaining safety at a construction work site. This includes identifying the types and causes of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and explaining the tools, equipment, and work practices employees can use to prevent them.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize the role ergonomics plays in helping construction workers avoid work-related musculoskeletal disorders through identifying and avoiding risk factors
  • Identify how to avoid on-the-job injury for hand-intensive work, overhead and floor work, and manual materials handling.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

Regulations

OSHA - the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

All construction employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Ergonomics in the Office

Overview

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) result when there is a mismatch between the physical capacity of workers and the physical demands of their jobs. Each year 1.8 million workers in the United States report work-related MSDs such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and back injuries. About 600,000 MSDs are serious enough to result in workers having to take time off work to recover. The solution to these injuries lies with ergonomics, the science of fitting the job to the worker. This course may help reduce the number and severity of MSDs caused by exposure to risk factors in the workplace. 

Designed for office workers, this course teaches workers methods to reduce the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome and other repetitive stress injuries. Main topics include ergonomic awareness, workplace risk factors, and how to reduce those factors in an office setting.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and recognize the office activities that lead to these disorders
  • Use an awareness of ergonomics to set up a workstation to minimize MSDs
  • Use an awareness of ergonomics to minimize injuries while working in awkward postures or doing repetitive tasks
  • Employ stretching techniques, physical exercise, and an ergonomic program to minimize MSDs.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all office employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Excavations (Construction)

Overview

Each year in the United States, an estimated 100 deaths occur and over 1,000 workers are injured in excavation accidents. 

This course describes the OSHA standards and safety aspects of excavation and trenching operations as performed in the construction industry. Students are introduced to the mechanics of cave-ins and how to perform soil analysis to classify soil. The student will learn how to protect workers through the use of shoring, shielding, or sloping operations as well as special situations that arise in field environments.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Understand excavation dangers and the OSHA regulations devised to help keep workers safe
  • Identify three types of soil using manual and visual soil tests
  • Explain the dynamics of a cave-in and identify three methods which protect workers from trench collapse
  • Demonstrate awareness of special circumstances surrounding excavations and the role of key workers in an excavation.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for construction workers and supervisors who work in and around trenches and excavations.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Fall Protection

Overview

OSHA estimates that due to falls from elevations covered under subpart M, every year at least 68,000 injuries and 95 fatalities occur. One OSHA study of 99 fall-related fatalities suggests that virtually all of those deaths could have been prevented by the use of guardrails, body belts, body harnesses, safety nets, covers, or other means which would reduce employee exposure to the fall hazard.

This course teaches employees to use fall protection systems in construction settings. Main topics include: the OSHA fall protection standards, fall protection systems, selection of fall protection measures, and inspection and maintenance of fall protection systems.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Understand the consequences of workplace falls
  • List six fall protection solutions
  • Describe when and how fall protection systems are commonly used
  • Identify instances when retraining is necessary
  • Explain the steps involved in performing a fall protection inspection.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart M

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction workers whose jobs require fall protection and their supervisors.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Fire Safety (Construction)

Overview

This course teaches employees the OSHA standard for workplace safety regarding fire in the construction industry. Topics include general information about fire and the OSHA requirements for fire prevention and protection. The different types of portable fire extinguishers are described, including the advantages and disadvantages of each type.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify methods of fire prevention at a construction site
  • Describe OSHA requirements for fire protection, particularly regarding fire extinguishers.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA – 29 CFR 1926 Subpart F

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees in the construction industry.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Fire Safety and Emergency Preparedness (General Industry)

Overview

OSHA requires employers to provide a safe workplace, which includes preparing for all sorts of emergencies. Workplace emergencies can be natural or manmade. Either way, the biggest risk to workers often isn't the emergency itself, but injuries sustained when trying to escape because of panic, confusion, and lack of information.

This course covers the OSHA standards for fire prevention and emergency preparedness. Topics include general information about fire and other potential workplace emergencies and the OSHA requirements for exit routes, Fire Prevention plans, Emergency Action plans, and fire protection.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize the dangers of fires and other potential workplace emergencies
  • Explain the OSHA requirements for exit routes
  • Outline the requirements for Fire Prevention Plans and Emergency Action Plans
  • Describe OSHA requirements for fire protection, particularly regarding fire extinguishers.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA – 29 CFR 1910 Subparts E and L

Approximate Length

2 hours

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.2

First Aid

Overview

OSHA requires employers to provide a safe and healthy workplace that is reasonably free of occupational hazards. However, accidents do happen. Therefore, employers are also required to provide medical and first aid personnel and supplies proportional to the hazards of the workplace. 

This course teaches basic first aid techniques for employees and managers in any workplace. Main topics include: recognizing emergency situations, trauma injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies such as heart attack and seizures, environmental emergencies such as poisoning and temperature extremes, and universal precautions such as preventing illness.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize when an emergency has occurred and take emergency action steps
  • Choose the best treatment for injuries such as bleeding, shock, and burns
  • List the correct first aid procedures for chest injuries, fractures and sprains, and head and eye injuries
  • Identify and treat poisoning, stings, and bites
  • Implement Universal Precautions to protect yourself and others from infectious diseases associated with bodily fluids.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart K

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Flammable and Combustible Liquids

Overview

Flammable and combustible liquids present a significant danger in the workplace. When stored or used improperly, these liquids can cause significant property destruction, worker injuries, and even fatalities. OSHA provides rules on the safe storage and use of flammable and combustible liquids to help minimize the dangers the liquids impose in the workplace.

The bulk of the OSHA regulations on flammable and combustible liquids are included in OSHA's General Industry regulations, 49 CFR 1910, in Subpart H, Hazardous Materials. Additional rules are found in the OSHA regulations covering the Construction Industry, 49 CFR 1926, Subpart F, Fire Protection. This course focuses on the General Industry Standard, but the relevant fire protection regulations from the Construction Standard are included here, too.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • List the rules and definitions for flammable and combustible liquids, including the rules for safely storing these liquids and the rules for using the liquids in spray finishing and dipping and coating operations
  • Match safety rules for flammable and combustible liquids with specific workplace settings, including industrial plants, bulk plants, service stations, processing plants, refineries, chemical plants, and distilleries.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

29 CFR 1910.106, .108, and .125, and 29 CFR 1926.152

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is appropriate for anyone who works around or with flammable and combustible liquids.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Forklift Safety

Overview

OSHA's forklift regulations are intended to reduce the number of injuries and deaths that occur as a result of inadequate operator training. The regulations apply to all industries (general industry, construction, shipyards, marine terminals, and longshoring operations) in which forklift trucks are used, except agricultural operations. OSHA estimates that compliance with OSHA training requirements will prevent 11 deaths and 9,422 injuries per year. 

This course is designed to meet OSHA requirements for becoming an authorized forklift (powered industrial truck) operator. After students successfully complete this course and demonstrate their skills by driving and operating a forklift, they will be considered an authorized powered industrial truck operator.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe forklift operator requirements
  • List the items that must be checked in a pre-operation inspection
  • State the specific characteristics of your forklift
  • Recognize workplace hazards
  • List safe driving rules and key safety concerns
  • Demonstrate safe load handling procedures
  • Explain how to recharge batteries, change batteries or propane tanks, and refuel a forklift
  • Discuss safe operating procedures for special units of forklifts.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.178

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all forklift operators.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

GHS Hazard Communication

Overview

OSHA has estimated that more than 32 million workers are exposed to 650,000 hazardous chemical products in more than 3 million American workplaces. OSHA's Chemical Hazard Communication Standard is based on a simple concept that employees have both a need and a right to know the hazards and identities of the chemicals they are exposed to while working. As such, the Hazcom Standard has been known as OSHA's Worker Right to Know Standard and is designed to provide employees with the information they need to work safely. 

This GHS Hazard Communication training covers basic OSHA requirements for proper communication methods about hazardous chemicals in any workplace, including the modification of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard to conform with the United Nations' (UN) Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) requirements. 

Topics include the OSHA Hazard Communication and Globally Harmonized System (GHS) standard, and requirements of an effective GHS Hazcom program. Also covered are the types of potential hazardous chemicals and the Hazardous Chemical Inventory, the purpose and information required by GHS of Safety Data Sheets (SDS), the required information for proper labels, including GHS pictograms, and Hazcom information and training requirements.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the elements of the Hazard Communication Standard, including what should be included in a Written Hazard Communication Program, and recognize who is covered by it
  • Identify physical and health hazards of chemicals and recognize what should be included in a Hazardous Chemical Inventory
  • Recognize the information contained in a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) under the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) and how it is used and maintained in the workplace
  • Identify where and how hazard warning labels must be used, what information is required on labels under GHS, and the meaning of GHS pictograms
  • Recognize the elements required of a Hazard Communication Standard training program.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1200 & 1926.59

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who work near or with hazardous chemicals.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Hand and Power Tools (Construction)

Overview

Hand tools play a big role in construction work. Because they are used so commonly, it is easy to forget how dangerous they can be when used incorrectly or maintained improperly. This course explains the importance of safely using and maintaining hand and power tools and identifies common hazards and how to avoid them.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize safety hazards associated with non-powered hand tools, and identify how to avoid those hazards by safely using the appropriate tools for work tasks
  • Identify the safety hazards associated with the different types of powered hand tools, and recognize the safety precautions you need to take to control or avoid those hazards.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart I - Tools, Hand and Power

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

All construction employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

HAZWOPER 8-Hour Refresher

Overview

When supplemented with site-specific information, this course meets the OSHA requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 for eight hours of annual refresher training for workers conducting clean-up operations at hazardous waste sites.

This AdvanceOnline HAZWOPER 8-Hour Refresher course covers: an overview of the HAZWOPER regulation, recent HAZWOPER developments, rules for a well-designed safety and health program, information about recognizing hazards, methods for controlling workplace hazards, information on PPE, rules and tools for monitoring hazards and conducting medical surveillance, confined space entry procedures, decontamination and emergency response procedures, and site-specific requirements.

In addition, this course includes information on these safety topics: materials handling guidelines, emergency preparedness, stairs, ladders, and scaffolds, general safety requirements for welding and cutting, and safely using flammable and combustible liquids in specific workplace settings.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Find the HAZWOPER regulation and the related resources provided by OSHA, recognize the main topics of the HAZWOPER regulation, and list the general training requirements
  • Recognize the HAZWOPER 8-hour refresher training requirements, list recent changes in the law that may affect HAZWOPER employees, and apply lessons learned from the mistakes of others to avoid hazardous materials incidents at your workplace
  • Identify the components that should be present in your workplace safety and health program as required by the HAZWOPER regulations
  • Identify how the employer recognizes hazards through the site characterization and analysis and how the employee identifies hazards on the job
  • Identify the different methods of controlling hazards at the workplace
  • Identify how to select the appropriate level and type PPE for workplace hazards while recognizing the potential hazards of PPE use
  • Identify the air monitoring and medical surveillance requirements for monitoring the hazards faced by workers involved in hazardous waste operations
  • Recognize the hazards and safe entry procedures for working in and around a confined space
  • Recognize the HAZWOPER rules for decontamination and emergency response
  • Recognize the site-specific requirements for a HAZWOPER jobsite
  • Identify the general safety guidelines for materials handling, the proper way to manually handle materials, and the rules for moving and storing materials
  • Explain the OSHA requirements for exit routes and Emergency Action plans
  • Recognize safe work practices for installing, maintaining, and using stairs, ladders, and scaffolds
  • Outline the general safety requirements for welding and cutting
  • Match safety rules for flammable and combustible liquids with specific workplace settings, including industrial plants, bulk plants, service stations, processing plants, refineries, chemical plants, and distilleries.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.120

Approximate Length

8 hours

Audience

This course is intended for all general site workers who remove hazardous waste or who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances or health hazards.

This refresher course is intended ONLY for those who have already completed the 40-hour or 24-hour HAZWOPER training.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.8

Health Hazards in Construction: Lead and Silica

Overview

As a construction worker, you may sometimes encounter hazards to your health in the air that you breathe at work. Two of the most severe hazards come from lead and crystalline silica in the air. Both can cause you to suffer from debilitating, and even fatal, diseases.

This course covers information you need to know about lead and crystalline silica, and how to keep yourself safe from these hazards while at the work place.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe hazards posed by lead and crystalline silica in construction and how to control and avoid them.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926.62 Lead & OSHA – 29 CFR 1910.1000 Air Contaminants

Approximate Length

30 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all workers involved in construction.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Hearing Conservation

Overview

Noise, or unwanted sound, is one of the most pervasive occupational health problems. It is a by-product of many industrial processes. Exposure to high levels of noise causes hearing loss and may cause other harmful health effects as well. OSHA's hearing conservation program has been designed to protect workers with significant occupational noise exposures from suffering material hearing impairment. 

This course teaches basic hearing conservation measures and standards for employees and managers. Main topics include OSHA regulations, types of hearing protection, monitoring/testing and calibration, training requirements, record keeping, and noise level control.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe the functioning of the ear, how it is affected by noise, and ways to control noise in the workplace
  • Explain the elements of OSHA Regulation 1910.95, including training, monitoring, testing, and recordkeeping requirements
  • Select and use proper hearing protection whenever excessive noise is encountered
  • Describe the elements of a noise monitoring program
  • Explain the components of audiometric testing and describe the audiogram and its uses.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.95

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees potentially exposed to harmful noise levels.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Heavy Equipment (Construction)

Overview

As a construction worker, you may encounter heavy equipment at the worksite. You may even operate heavy equipment. The equipment can save a lot of time, but it also introduces many hazards; this type of equipment can cause injuries, and even deaths, at construction worksites.

By following the safety rules for working with or near heavy equipment, you can avoid injuries. You will learn how to recognize and use the appropriate signs, signals, and barricades, the rules for safe operation of mechanized equipment, and the key function of roll-over protective structures. You can be safe when working with or near heavy equipment.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize the safe work practices for working with or near heavy equipment at a construction worksite.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subparts G, O, and W

Approximate Length

30 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all construction employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)

Overview

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is a deadly substance that results naturally from decaying organic matter. It is one of the leading causes of workplace death due to gas inhalation. Even brief exposure to relatively small amounts can cause acute symptoms and even death.

This course explains the health and physical hazards of H2S, identifies where exposure is possible, and lists steps to limit exposure. It also outlines what to do in case of accidental release or exposure.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate understanding of what Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is, where it is found, and how it is produced
  • Recognize the physical and health hazards of H2S by recalling the health risks of H2S and identifying where exposure is possible
  • Recognize the steps to limit exposure and what to do in case of accidental release or exposure.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

  • 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-2 (General Industry)
  • 29 CFR 1926.55 Appendix A (Construction Safety and Health)
  • NIOSH exposure recommendations Oct. 2013

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

Workers who are, or may be, exposed to H2S either directly or indirectly. This course is not industry specific but will be appropriate to workers in the following industries:

  • Oil & Gas
  • Manufacturing
  • Trucking
  • Waste treatment

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Introduction to Industrial Hygiene

Overview

Work sites have risks. This simple statement is true across all types of work sites and locations. Even an environmentally-friendly office space can have potential risks of slips and trips, physical injuries, electrical hazards, etc. Industrial hygiene is a field dedicated to knowing how to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and recommend controls for the environmental and physical hazards that can affect the health and well-being of workers.

Industrial Hygienists are people who specialize in this field. They are highly trained to assist in worksite analyses as well as recognize and control hazards. These professionals also have a role in developing and issuing OSHA standards to protect workers.

In this course, you will learn more details about the Industrial Hygiene field and the roles and responsibilities of Industrial Hygienists. Specific topics include the characteristics of a worksite analysis, potential job hazards, as well as recognizing and controlling hazards.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize the role of the Industrial Hygienist in analyzing the worksite and controlling the types of hazards present on the job site
  • Define the characteristics of a worksite analysis
  • Identify the categories of job hazards and recognize types of each
  • Define the three primary means of reducing employee exposure to occupational hazards.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Approximate Length

30 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Introduction to OSHA (Construction)

Overview

OSHA was created in 1971, and since that time, workplace fatalities have been cut in half and occupational injury and illness rates have declined 40 percent. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) exists as a federal agency in the Department of Labor. OSHA administers the federal safety and health laws that require employers to provide a safe and healthy workplace for their employees.

The OSHA regulations include an entire Part covering the construction industry - 29 CFR 1926. In this course we take a look at the OSH Act which created OSHA, OSHA's role in making workplaces safer, and OSHA's general requirements for construction workplaces.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:

  • Recognize the role OSHA and the OSH Act has played and continues to play in increasing workplace safety
  • Recognize how the General Duty Clause and consensus standards affect employers
  • Identify the volume, part, subparts, and paragraphs that provide the OSHA regulations for construction and list the types of citations and fines associated with violating those rules
  • List the activities of an inspector, the rights of an employer, and the rights of an employee - including whistleblower protection - before, during, and after an OSHA inspection
  • Recognize the general safety and health provisions, including the role of the competent person, and the recordkeeping requirements for workplaces that fall under OSHA's Construction regulations.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

Regulations

OSHA - the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act and 29 CFR 1926 Subpart C - General Safety and Health Provisions

Approximate Length

2 hours

Audience

This course is intended for all construction employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.2

Introduction to OSHA (General Industry)

Overview

OSHA was created in 1971, and since that time, workplace fatalities have been cut in half and occupational injury and illness rates have declined 40 percent. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) exists as a federal agency in the Department of Labor. OSHA administers the federal safety and health laws that require employers to provide a safe and healthy workplace for their employees. 

In addition to covering the history of the OSH Act, this course discusses the General Duty Clause, provides a framework for reading and understanding the regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs), walks a student through a typical OSHA inspection process, and provides information on the costs of violations and the benefits of complying with the regulations.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act
  • Explain how the General Duty Clause affects employers
  • Demonstrate how to reference the OSHA regulations using paragraph and section numbers
  • Identify the different types of OSHA violations
  • Explain how OSHA conducts inspections
  • Explain the cost and benefits of providing a safe workplace.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act and 29 CFR

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees whose job safety is governed by the OSH Act.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Ladder Safety

Overview

Most accidents involving ladders can be attributed to improper use, unsafe work conditions, or a lack of safety training. 

This course teaches basic safety for any employee who will work on a ladder. Main topics include: ladder hazards, the OSHA ladder standard, ladder selection, and ladder maintenance.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Evaluate the regulatory standards that govern the use of ladders in the workplace
  • Identify general and design requirements specific to ladder construction, use, and maintenance
  • Describe the hazards and injuries associated with ladder use and the major causes for ladder related injuries
  • Select the appropriate ladder for your specific job tasks
  • Set up and properly use a ladder
  • Inspect a ladder for signs of wear or damage and assure the ladder is properly maintained.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart X Construction and 1910.25-.27 General Industry

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who use ladders in the workplace.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Lockout/Tagout

Overview

Locking and/or tagging out equipment is essential because it protects employees from unexpected start up while service work is being performed. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued 3,279 citations and $3,217,970 in lockout/tagout violation fines in 1999, making it the second most frequently cited topic. Employees need to know why, when, and how they must comply with Lockout/Tagout requirements. 

This course provides instruction in awareness, lockout/tagout devices, standard lockout/tagout procedures, and special lockout/tagout procedures. 

Note: Some states have regulations that supplement the OSHA standard. To be sure you meet any additional lockout/tagout requirements, check your state's laws.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Evaluate the regulatory standards that govern the control of hazardous energy
  • Identify hazardous energy sources and use appropriate energy-isolating devices
  • Describe the procedures for conducting a lockout/tagout
  • Identify special lockout/tagout circumstances and procedures.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.147

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for authorized employees who perform lockout/tagout operations. The course also provides an overview of safety procedures for affected and other employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Managing Safety and Health

Overview

All levels of an organization, from the top management team through the entire organization of the work force, should actively participate in their Safety and Health Program. The priorities in a good Safety and Health culture include positive attitudes, safe behaviors, accountability, and continuous improvement. The resulting benefits of this type of safety culture can be seen in fewer risky behaviors, reduced numbers of accidents and incidents, better protection for employees’ health and safety, and an improved financial bottom-line.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:

  • Outline the direct and indirect costs of accidents in the workplace, the direct and indirect benefits of accident prevention, and the basic elements and benefits of a strong safety and health culture
  • Recognize the actions supervisors and employees take to contribute to a safe and healthy workplace and recognize the steps involved in a worksite analysis
  • Outline the methods for controlling and preventing hazards, and evaluating a good safety and health program
  • Identify how training, positive attitudes toward safety, and strategic planning contribute to a safe and healthy workplace.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

Approximate Length

2 hours

Audience

This course is intended for any general industry and construction employee with some safety responsibility.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.2

Materials Handling (Construction)

Overview

Working on a construction site requires workers to handle, move, use, and dispose of the building materials utilized. Handling materials safely should be a primary goal of every worker on the site. Improper, inadequate, or unsafe handling of materials causes injuries and even death in many cases. 

This course provides an introduction to handling materials on the job site, including moving, storing, and disposing of materials.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the OSHA regulations that apply to materials handling
  • Discuss safe storage and housekeeping practices for materials
  • Inspect rigging equipment for defects and damage
  • Recite basic crane safety, use, and inspection requirements
  • Explain basic conveyor use, hazards, and safety
  • Discuss basic forklift operations, safe practices, and training requirements
  • Dispose of waste material safely.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart H

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who handle materials on a construction site.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Materials Handling (General Industry)

Overview

Many jobs require workers to handle, move, and store different types of materials. Handling materials safely should be a primary goal of every worker. Improper, inadequate, or unsafe handling of materials causes injuries and even death.

This course provides an introduction to materials handling, including moving and storing materials, and the rules for using powered industrial trucks or cranes and slings to get the job done.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the general safety guidelines for materials handling, the proper way to manually handle materials, and the rules for moving and storing materials
  • Identify the Materials Handling rules for using powered industrial trucks
  • Identify the Materials Handling rules for using cranes and slings.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart N

Approximate Length

1 hour 30 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees involved in materials handling.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.2

Permit-Required Confined Spaces

Overview

Permit-required confined spaces (PRCS) are found throughout industry. Furnaces, vaults, tanks, sewers, and countless other types of workspaces are confined spaces according to OSHA. Employees enter these spaces on a regular basis to perform various activities. 

If you enter a permit-required confined space, you must be properly trained to ensure your safety and the safety of your coworkers. 

In this course, you will learn how to recognize and safely work in permit-required confined spaces. You will also learn what to do if conditions change or if an emergency situation arises while you're working in a permit-required confined space.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of the Permit-Required Confined Spaces Standard and employer responsibilities under the Standard
  • Identify industries and businesses covered by the Permit-Required Confined Spaces Standard
  • Define hazards that may be found in a non-permit-required confined space and a permit-required confined space
  • Classify confined spaces using information provided to you.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.146

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who enter confined spaces.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Personal Protective Equipment (Construction)

Overview

OSHA's workplace incident data indicate that a significant portion of all work-related injuries and fatalities involve workers being struck in the eyes, head, face, hand, and or feet by foreign objects. For example, it has been estimated that as many as 2,500 eye injuries occur in the workplace every working day. 

Personal protective equipment (PPE) protects you, your co-workers, and your livelihood when hazards are present in the workplace. 

This course covers the use of personal protective equipment in a construction setting. Main topics include general OSHA PPE requirements, eye and face protection, foot protection, hand protection, and head protection.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Take responsibility for correctly fitting, maintaining, training on, and using personal protective equipment
  • Conduct a workplace hazard evaluation and follow guidelines to select personal protective equipment
  • Prevent eye injuries by recognizing and eliminating potential workplace hazards and by selecting proper eye protective devices
  • Avoid foot injuries by understanding and eliminating potential workplace hazards and by choosing appropriate foot protection
  • Prevent head injuries by keeping an eye on overhead hazards and determining the correct type of hard hat for the job.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart E

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction workers and supervisors potentially exposed to hazards to the head, eyes, hands, and feet.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Personal Protective Equipment (General Industry)

Overview

OSHA's workplace incident data indicate that a significant portion of all work related injuries and fatalities involve workers being struck in the eyes, head, face, hand, and or feet by foreign objects. For example, it has been estimated that as many as 2,500 eye injuries occur in the workplace every working day.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) protects you, your co-workers, and your livelihood when hazards are present in the workplace. Personal protective equipment is not a substitute for good work practices or controls. No single combination of personal protective equipment or clothing is capable of protecting you from all hazards, so PPE must be used in conjunction with guards, engineering controls, and administrative controls to ensure your safety and health. 

In this course you will learn what OSHA requires. This includes training on what PPE is necessary, when it is necessary, how to properly put on, take off, adjust, and wear PPE, the limitations of PPE, and the proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of PPE.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Take responsibility for correctly fitting, maintaining, training on, and using personal protective equipment
  • Conduct a workplace hazard evaluation and follow guidelines to select personal protective equipment
  • Prevent eye injuries by recognizing and eliminating potential workplace hazards and by selecting proper eye protective devices
  • Avoid foot injuries by understanding and eliminating potential workplace hazards and by choosing appropriate foot protection
  • Protect hands during work by realizing and preventing potential hazards and by deciding on correct hand protection for the job
  • Prevent head injuries by keeping an eye on overhead hazards and determining the correct type of hard hat for the job.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart I

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees exposed to hazards to the head, eyes, hands, and feet.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Respiratory Protection

Overview

OSHA's Respiratory Protection Standard applies to general industry, construction, shipyard, longshoring, and marine terminal workplaces. The regulations establish uniform guidelines for protecting workers when they must work in hazardous atmospheres. 

This course teaches employees how to protect themselves from airborne contaminants in the workplace. Main topics include contaminants in the workplace, classes of respirators, respiratory selection, using the respirator, and OSHA regulatory requirements.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Specify the requirements of OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standard
  • List the components of a respiratory protection program
  • Identify how to detect airborne contaminants in the workplace, assess their dangers and to protect against them
  • Describe the use and function of different respirators
  • Identify and select appropriate respiratory protection equipment
  • Inspect and maintain respiratory equipment

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.134

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees potentially exposed to airborne contaminants.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Safe Driving Practices

Overview

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of accidental deaths and injuries in the United States. Many businesses and agencies have recognized the direct benefits of safe driving programs, not only in the number of lives saved and injuries reduced, but also in the decreased hospitalization costs, lost production time, vehicle down time, and insurance rates. 

This course will help you recognize what it means to be a “safe” driver and will help you identify areas you may need to focus on to increase your own safe driving skills. Using safe choices and habits, you will learn how to make good choices for safety and how to develop good habits to avoid the bad choices other drivers may make.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Assess your own driving behaviors, and identify the attitudes, behaviors, and actions that characterize a safe driver, in order to identify what you may change or improve to be a safer driver, and recognize the tools a safe driver uses, such as maintaining space and using your eyes, to increase safety on the road.
  • Recognize how the choices you make impact safety and identify what safe choices you can make outside the vehicle, as well as those you make once you first get into the vehicle and during the drive, including managing in-vehicle distractions.
  • Recognize safe driving habits to help protect yourself and others from the risk of injury on the road, how maintaining space impacts safety, and identify how you can anticipate unsafe drivers or hazardous situations, including adverse weather or traffic congestion, and safely respond.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all drivers of personal and commercial vehicles. It is not aimed at CMV truckers (although many of the principles may be applicable)

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Scaffolds (Construction)

Overview

Falls from scaffolds are one of the most common causes of fatal accidents on construction sites. Improperly constructed scaffolds, which collapse under use or fail to provide proper footing, often lead to disaster. This course covers the OSHA regulations for construction workers who assemble or work on scaffolds. 

In this course you will learn to avoid the common mistakes made when using scaffolds, proper assembly and disassembling procedures, and inspections required for scaffolds. A discussion of the duties of the competent person as required by OSHA is also included.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Differentiate various types of scaffolds and determine how and when each is used
  • Explain the procedures and practices associated with scaffold assembly and disassembly
  • List the important OSHA regulations that pertain to scaffolds
  • Identify safe and unsafe scaffold use and access practices
  • Describe the duties and inspection requirements of the competent person.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926 Subpart L

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all construction workers and supervisors on and around scaffolds.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure

Overview

This course introduces the oil spill responsibilities mandated in 40 CFR 112. It includes an explanation of the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) rule, and it teaches how to determine if the rule is applicable to a facility. The course also outlines the general requirements for an SPCC plan, including what needs to happen to prepare and implement a plan.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Explain how Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure plans play a role in the EPA Oil Pollution Prevention regulation, define key terms in the regulation, identify who must comply with the regulation, and indicate how notifications and appeals work
  • Describe the SPCC plan, including the general requirements for a plan and how to prepare and implement a plan.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

EPA – 40 CFR 112.1-8 and 112.12

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

New and experienced operators and facility managers.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

SpotLight on Bloodborne Pathogens: Engineering and Work Practice Controls

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of Bloodborne Pathogens - Engineering and Work Practice Controls.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Define your responsibility and your employer's responsibilities regarding safe practices, and identify engineering and work practice controls used as precautionary measures.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1030

Approximate Length

10 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

SpotLight on Bloodborne Pathogens: Infectious Diseases in the Workplace

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of Bloodborne Pathogens - infectious diseases in the workplace.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the two most dangerous bloodborne pathogens in the workplace, and describe common symptoms and the modes of transmission

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1030

Approximate Length

10 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Spotlight on Fire Safety: Emergency Action Plans

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of Fire Safety and Emergency Preparedness (General Industry) - Emergency Action Plans.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Outline the purpose and requirements of Emergency Action plans.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.38

Approximate Length

10 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

SpotLight on Fire Safety: Fire Extinguisher Requirements, Classes, and Ratings

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of Fire Safety and Emergency Preparedness (General Industry) - fire extinguisher requirements, classes, and ratings.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Define OSHA requirements and describe the different classes and ratings for portable fire extinguishers.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA – 29 CFR 1910 Subpart L

Approximate Length

10 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

SpotLight on GHS Hazard Communication: Labels

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of GHS Hazard Communication – Labels.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Recognize the new Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) requirements for labels and recognize GHS pictograms with associated hazard definition
  • List the items that must appear on a hazardous chemical warning label and recognize where to find required information on a sample label
  • Define labeling and marking, recognize when labels need to be updated, and recognize worker responsibilities for labeling.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1200

Approximate Length

15 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

SpotLight on GHS Hazard Communication: Safety Data Sheets

Overview

This course provides a spotlight on one topic of GHS Hazard Communication – Safety Data Sheets.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the purpose of a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and identify who must provide the SDSs for hazardous chemicals
  • Recognize the 16 required sections of information on an SDS
  • Identify who must have access to SDS information and where an SDS should be kept.

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Self-assessment.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910.1200

Approximate Length

15 minutes

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Steel Erection (Construction)

Overview

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) designs and enforces standards to assure a safe work environment for America's workers. Because workers involved in steel erection face specific hazards, OSHA has developed standards to address and help minimize those hazards.

This course covers the OSHA Construction standards for employees involved in steel erection activities. Topics include the scope of the regulation, the training an employer is required to provide employees, and specific regulations concerning common processes in steel construction.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the scope of OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1926, Subpart R and components of the regulation that cover pre-erection activities
  • Identify the OSHA requirements for steel erection activities.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1926, Subpart R - Steel Erection

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is for all employees involved in the construction, alteration, or repair of buildings, bridges and other structures made of steel.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Walking-Working Surfaces (General Industry)

Overview

One of the ten most-cited serious OSHA general industry violations is part of the Walking-Working Surfaces regulations. Violations of 29 CFR 1910.23(c)(1) Open-Sided Floors accounted for 638 OSHA citations in FY 2005. In addition, slips, trips, and falls cause the majority of all general industry accidents and 15% of all accidental deaths.

This course covers the OSHA Walking-Working Surfaces standards for General Industry. This includes information on general safety requirements, protection from holes in the floor and walls, ladder safety, and scaffold safety.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Apply the OSHA regulations for walking and working surfaces to avoid slips, trips, and falls in the workplace
  • Recognize safe work practices for installing, maintaining, and using stairs, ladders, and scaffolds

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart D

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all general industry employees except for those in workplaces where only domestic work, mining operations, or agricultural operations occur.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Welding and Cutting

Overview

Welding and cutting are dangerous operations that require certain safety precautions. To help keep the workplace safe, OSHA provides some general safety guidelines. In addition to the general guidelines, there are some additional safety rules that must be followed for each specific type of welding and cutting - namely, gas welding and cutting, arc welding and cutting, and resistance welding. All of these requirements are covered in this course.

Most of the OSHA regulations on welding and cutting are included in OSHA's General Industry regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in Subpart Q, Welding, Cutting, and Brazing. Additional rules are found in the OSHA regulations covering the Construction Industry, 29 CFR 1926, Subpart J, Welding and Cutting. This course focuses on the General Industry Standard, but the relevant safety regulations from the Construction Standard are included here, too.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Outline the general safety requirements for welding and cutting
  • Describe the safety precautions to use for the different types of welding and cutting.

Features

This course has these features and more:

  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Units.

 

Regulations

OSHA - 29 CFR 1910 Subpart Q and 1926 Subpart J

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees who work on or around welding and cutting operations.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

Workplace Fires and Emergencies (General Industry)

Overview

This course teaches employees the OSHA standard for workplace safety regarding fire and other emergencies. Topics include general information about fire and other potential workplace emergencies and the OSHA requirements for exit routes, fire prevention plans, emergency action plans, and fire protection.

Objectives

After taking this course, you will be able to:
  • Explain the OSHA requirements for exit routes and Emergency Action plans
  • Describe OSHA requirements for Fire Prevention plans and portable fire extinguishers

Features

This course has these features and more:
  • Multimedia
  • Narration
  • Interactivity
  • Easy navigation
  • Supplementary material
  • Links to regulations
  • Real-world scenarios
  • Objective-based exams
  • Continuing Education Credits.

Regulations

OSHA – 29 CFR 1910 Subparts E and L

Approximate Length

1 hour

Audience

This course is intended for all employees.

Delivery Method

Online

Continuing Education Units

0.1

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